This is default featured slide 1 title
This is default featured slide 2 title
This is default featured slide 3 title
This is default featured slide 4 title
This is default featured slide 5 title
 

Monthly Archives: August 2016

Can a Cold Shower Really Benefit Your Hair, Skin and Metabolism?

A blast of chilly water may do the body good—but are the shivers worth it? Of all the beauty trends out there right now, this one might take the cake: searches for “cold showers” are up 75% on Pinterest, according to the social platform. Proponents claim the brrr-inducing temps help increase metabolism, boost mood, and even lead to healthier skin and hair.

But showers aren’t just about getting clean (hello, relaxation!), so a cold one better offer real perks. But does it?

Well… maybe. First, let’s talk beauty benefits. In terms of your hair, “the cold will flatten the ruffled cuticles and lock in moisture to prevent breakage,” says Jessie Cheung, MD, a dermatologist in the Chicago area. Cold water will initially help constrict blood vessels in your skin to temporarily tighten pores and decrease redness and puffiness, she adds. What’s more, cold temperatures boost circulation (it’s your body’s way of keeping warm). For your face, that might mean a healthy glow.

A cold shower is also said to help boost mood, but the evidence for this is slim. One study from the International Journal of Circumpolar Health looked at the practice of “winter swimming,” which is popular in Finland. Their findings suggest that regularly taking a dip in cold water (the participants swam four times a week) might improve energy and overall well-being. And a 2007 study published in Medical Hypotheses found that short 2-3 minute cold showers may help relieve depressive symptoms—but the researchers noted more widespread studies on this are needed.

There has been some emerging research suggesting cold temperatures may stimulate brown fat, a type of fat that burns extra calories. In a small 2014 study, men exposed to a cold environment had an increase in brown fat volume as well as corresponding fat metabolic activity. But again, there’s not enough research to suggest that taking cold showers can lead to weight loss.

The real benefits may come from avoiding super-hot showers in the first place. Hot water might feel good, but it does a number on your skin and hair, explains New York City-based dermatologist Lance Brown, MD. “Hot water will strip away some of the natural, protective oils that your skin makes,” he says, which can leave skin feeling dry and itchy and possibly exacerbate skin conditions like eczema. This is especially problematic during the winter months, when cold air outside and dry heat inside naturally make skin more parched.

brain cells can predict your age | How ?

 As we get older, our brain cells show changes, and now a new study finds that certain changes happen so reliably that by themselves they can reveal a person’s age.

In the study, researchers analyzed brain tissue samples from 480 people who died between the ages 16 and 106. None of these individuals had experienced a brain disease before their death.

The researchers then examined whether they could find differences between the older brains and the younger ones by looking at the level of their expression of certain genes, meaning which genes were “turned on” and “turned off.”

They found that, with age, certain types of brain cells called glial cells showed a shift in their gene expression patterns in certain regions of the brain. In contrast, no such change was seen in the brain’s neurons, which are the “signaling cells” of the brain. Glial cells provide support for neurons.

What’s more, when the researchers looked at whether the gene expression pattern inside the different types of cells could be used to predict a person’s age, they found that the gene expression levels of glial cells were most strongly linked with a person’s age.

“These findings reinforce a growing body of evidence implicating [glial cells] in aging,” the researchers, from the University College London, wrote in the Jan. 10 issue of the journal Cell Reports.

Some of the biggest shifts in glial-cell gene expression were seen in the hippocampus (which is involved in memory) and the substantia nigra (which is involved in movement).

Because these two brain areas are also affected in people in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, the study may provide insights into the roles that glial cells may play in these age-related diseases, the researchers said.

“We believe that our data, and computational approaches, provide a powerful resource for further study of the cellular and molecular changes taking place during human brain aging, and provide insights into the pre-clinical cellular phase of dementia,” the researchers said.

Still, more research is needed to better understand the cellular changes seen in the study, and how glial cells and neurons interact during aging in general and in people with age-related diseases, they said.

5 low-FODMAP

 1       Apples out for blueberries: An apple a day may keep the doctor away, but it may not keep IBS symptoms at bay. Apples areeliminated in a low FODMAP diet because they contain an excessive amount of fructose.Fructose is a type of sugar found in fruits. Foods that have excess fructose are considered high FODMAP and should be avoided by people who suffer from IBS. Such foods include apples, watermelon, cherries, mango, agave, and honey. Some fruits have less fructose than others though, and can safely be incorporated in a low FODMAP eating plan. Blueberries (20 blueberries), grapes (1 cup), orange (1 small), and kiwi (2 small) all make the low FODMAP list. Although these fruits are lower in fructose, people who suffer from IBS should still limit their overall fruit consumption as fructose in lower amounts can still add up when consumed in large quantities.

2        Artichokes out for eggplant: Foods high in fructan, a substance similar to fructose, and found in many vegetables and grains, are also high FODMAP and thus should be avoided. Foods high in fructans to avoid include: artichokes, garlic, leeks, scallions, onion, peas, and certain grains, nuts, and legumes. Before you swear off salads for life, know that there are plenty of low fructan vegetables that can be enjoyed by all. Eggplant, arugula, zucchini, sweet potato, spinach, tomatoes, and cucumbers all get the green light for low FODMAP dieters.

3       Pasta out for spaghetti squash: Aside from being high in carbohydrates and deliciousness, pasta is also high in fructans. For this reason, pasta is a no-go when following a low FODMAP plan. Other grains in addition to pasta that must be avoided include wheat and rye such as bread, crackers, cookies, and couscous. To get your pasta fix, you can make spaghetti squash or zucchini noodles, as both zucchini and squash are low FODMAP foods, or use a gluten-free pasta like quinoa pasta. Other suitable low FODMAP grain products and grains include gluten-free bread, millet bread, rice, and spelt bread.

4       Cottage cheese out for mozzarella cheese: A commonly known gastric irritant, lactose, is another defining characteristic of high FODMAP foods.Therefore, high lactose foods are also high in FODMAPs, and should be should be avoided if following a low FODMAP diet. Such high lactose foods include cottage cheese, milk, yogurt, and ricotta cheese. These high lactose foods can be swapped for dairy products that are lower in lactose such as lactose-free milk and cheese, hard cheeses like mozzarella and cheddar and feta cheese.

5       Kidney beans out for lentils – Beans beans they’re good for your heart, the more you eat, the more you… Well, let’s just say… they’re high in FODMAPS. Legumes like kidney beans, soy beans, black beans, split peas, garbanzo beans, navy beans are considered a high FODMAP food because of their high fructan content. Following a low FODMAP diet doesn’t mean beans are completely off limits though. Interestingly, canned beans have a lower FODMAP value than regular, and of legumes, lentils are your best bet. Swap any of the beans mentioned above for 1/4 cup canned lentils to get your bean-on in a way that will be more comfortable for you… and those around you….

California Woman’s Death Because Meningitis

 Health officials said a California Bay Area woman’s death was likely caused by bacterial meningitis, which would make it the second fatality linked to the illness in one week. David Robson, Laura Robson’s brother, told a local news outlet that his sister had complained of a headache and a slight fever before her death.

Robson reportedly was already dead when she was found in the back of a San Francisco Muni bus, which was located in Daly City at the time, NBC Bay Area reported. A preliminary investigation said the 53-year-old’s cause of death was likely meningitis, David told the news outlet, but a complete autopsy is being conducted by the San Mateo County Coroner’s Office.

David and his 5-year-old son received antibiotic treatment as a precaution, NBC Bay Area reported.

On January 7, Seven Phillips, a 48-year-old San Rafael resident, died of bacterial meningitis. As a precaution, more than 200 individuals who attended classes at the SoulCycle location which Phillips frequented were contacted by the spin studio. Phillips contracted the infection between December 31 and January 7, but did not contract it at the popular fitness studio. No one has reported symptoms so far, the New York Post reported.

“While the rider did not contract the infection at our studio, we have nonetheless been in constant communication with the Department of Health which has emphasized that there is no evidence of any health risk to our riders,” SoulCycle said in a statement, according to NBC Bay Area.

The disease is rare and risk of infection is low. It spreads through respiratory droplets, coughing and sneezing and can stay on surfaces.

David told NBC Bay Area that his sister had not attended a SoulCycle class at the studio Phillips had visited.